Oh Christmas Tree…

Not too long ago this video appeared in my youtube feed. I went from, “That’s cool, I could make that” to “I should make that” to “I MUST MAKE THIS NOW” and uh… yeah.

To be honest I had been wanting to update my little Christmas tree, but hadn’t decided on how. I’ve had it for at least 10 years or so… possibly longer. I think I bought it from a Michael’s store shortly after getting into model horses, and it’s appeared in most of my hobby-Christmas photos ever since.

In fact, here’s the first one I have, which featured my wild mustangs collection and an early attempt at creating an indoor photo setup.

Small photo is small, how sad :(
Small photo is small, how sad 😦

It’s not a bad little tree.

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It’s even got it’s own set of working lights, big plastic ornaments and a sparkly pipecleaner star:

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But the nagging thought of making a more realistic in-scale(ish) tree was growing louder. SO, I ordered a batch of green princess pine off ebay…

PrincessPine

And proceeded to follow the tutorial and assemble a miniature Christmas tree:

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Some things were learned. This stuff is preserved foliage, so it’s fragile. Also, it sheds a bit, and turns your fingers green when you work with it.
The tutorial was easy enough to follow along, but I did switch some things up to make it easier. I ended up gluing the wire-wrapped branches in place as I went. (this was mostly to space them out… there’s quite a difference between 1:12 and 1:9 scale so I didn’t want to run out of pine) Most of the top branches were glued in place as well, using a glue gun since it set much more quickly.

Eventually I ended up with a tree. (and a huge mess)

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The stand was made from an empty plastic spool, sandwiched between two large circles cut from cardboard. Looking back, I probably should’ve painted it or at least flipped it over. Oh well.

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Here it is compared to the other tree:

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I ended up with enough pine leftover to make a simple wreath as well:

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Once the tree was made, it was time to start making decorations for it. The first thing it got was a tree-skirt, since I couldn’t have one with the other tree and that’s been bugging me for years:

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This was followed by ornaments, and little boxes to put them in. The boxes I found here – I resized mine before printing them though.

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The ornaments were made from beads,

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buttons, and charms:

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I also made an angel for the top, using a button and a gold-painted cone made from card stock:

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Once that was all done, I needed some way to contain it all, so another box was in order.

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Problem solved!

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I might have had too much fun setting it all up. (“So Nichelle, what do you do in your free time?” “Uhh…”)

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It was a fun project though and I’m pleased with how it turned out.

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5 thoughts on “Oh Christmas Tree…

  1. Thanks for sharing your process with us! I found the artist’s gluing technique and sculpting the tiny snow globes interesting. She used a brush to apply glue when she used it. Dufus me, I never thought of that. Glue is sometimes the make or break detail!

  2. Very cool! Love your ornaments and the little lights.
    I once made a similar tree for my little riders.
    Be careful when you put it away in January and make sure that the (metal) ornaments don’t touch the tree for the rest of the year. Those pine branches are treated with a stuff that makes metal (wire etc) dull. I learned that the hard way…

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